Tagged: 2012

14 Minutes

14 minutes alberto salazar john brant rodale 201214 Minutes: A Running Legend’s Life and Death and Life by Alberto Salazar and John Brant, 5/5

Salazar’s life-story is every bit the page-turner that the book’s title suggests. It was fascinating to get a glimpse into the obsession that drives world-class athletes, but I was even more interested in how Salazar dealt with injury, set-backs, losses and depression to establish a thriving post-competitive career in a non-lucrative sport.

Why I read it: My friend, Peggy, passed it on to me.

Advertisements

Jasotron: 2012

jasotron 2012 amend andrews mcmeel 2012Jasotron: 2012: A FoxTrot Collection by Bill Amend, 4/5

Usually I’m not a big fan of humor that relies on pop cultural references, but Amend is legitimately funny at times and obviously a huge nerd, which is all I require in a cartoonist.

Why I read it: my brother got it out of the library and it ended up in my gym bag, fulfilling the important role of “backup book” (in case of unforeseen boredom).  I ended up reading half of it while waiting at a Jack in the Box drive-thru for some idiot to collect their $60 order.

Tread Lightly

tread lightly larson katovsky skyhorse 2012Tread Lightly: Form, Footwear, and the Quest for Injury-Free Running by Peter Larson and Bill Katovsky, 2/5

The authors are passionate about their topic but I feel this book contributes little to a discussion that is already very much lacking in scientific research and consensus among experts (or at least was in 2012, when it was written).  In an approach reminiscent of the average college essayist, Larson and Katovsky cite a steady stream of inconclusive scientific studies and often-contradictory information that they do not have the expertise to interpret.  Slap on some weak conclusions and the reader is left with a few interesting facts and no real guidance on how to apply them.

Why I read it: My dad mentioned it in conversation.

How to Tell if Your Cat is Plotting to Kill You

how to tell if your cat is plotting to kill you inman andrews mcmeel 2012How to Tell if Your Cat is Plotting to Kill You by Matthew Inman (aka The Oatmeal), 4/5

A laugh-out-loud-funny collection of cat-themed comics from The Oatmeal.

[Why I read it: Reading Inman’s The Terrible and Wonderful Reasons Why I Run Long Distances reminded me that he has other hilarious books out there that I hadn’t read yet.]

Rich Dad’s Guide to Investing

rich dads guide to investing robert t kiyosakiRich Dad’s Guide to Investing: What the Rich Invest In, That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not! by Robert T. Kiyosaki, 2/5

Given this book’s large size, I hoped to find a lot of helpful, practical information in it that would help me learn the basic concepts and vocabulary of investing and perhaps give some direction on how to best invest any “excess” cash I might accumulate.  Disappointingly, Kiyosaki’s anecdotal style, focus on generalities, and avoidance of technical terminology rendered the book almost completely unhelpful.  There are a couple interesting concepts, such as creating valuable businesses yourself instead of simply investing in other people’s businesses and using your business to purchase assets so that you can stay poor on paper and avoid paying tax.  Unfortunately, much of the information seemed pretty sketchy and the author provides very few examples of his ideas in action.  Overall, this book felt like a waste of time and casts a rather charlatan shade over Kiyosaki’s whole financial self-help enterprise.

[Why I read it: I’ve read several of Kiyosaki’s books and this one looked interesting.]

Ready Player One

ready player one ernest clineReady Player One: A Novel by Ernest Cline, 3/5

A dystopian setting in Planet Earth’s near future provides an interesting contrast to the steady stream of 1980s trivia in this homage to geek culture. It is, perhaps, unreasonable to complain about the preponderance of cliches and stereotypes in this novel, since Cline uses them effectively to create an exciting, page-turner story. However, the complete lack of character development, increasingly contrived plot, clumsy foreshadowing, excruciatingly poorly-written “love” angle, and lightweight ending complete with deus ex machina ultimately kind of killed it for me.

[Why I read it: I waited so long for this book to come in at the library that I’ve completely forgotten how I heard about it.  Perhaps a friend told me about it?]