Tagged: webcomic

Adulthood is a Myth

adulthood is a myth sarah andersen 2016 andrews mcmeel publishingAdulthood is a Myth: A “Sarah’s Scribbles” collection, by Sarah Andersen, 5/5

Hilarious and strangely, one might say worryingly, relatable.

Why I read it: I love Andersen’s webcomic and other book.

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Big Mushy Happy Lump

big mushy happy lump andersen andrews mcmeel publishing 2017Big Mushy Happy Lump: A “Sarah’s Scribbles” Collection by Sarah Andersen, 5/5

I love the Sarah’s Scribbles webcomic and this book is more of the same laughs.  My boyfriend looked at the first illustration, of a small girl with big eyes cozied up in a comically huge hoodie, and was like “This is written about you?”  Then he turned to the first comic, about procrastination, and was like “This is written about you!”

Why I read it: saw it advertised on the webcomic site.

Why Grizzly Bears Should Wear Underpants

why grizzly bears should wear underpants inman andrews mcmeel 2013Why Grizzly Bears Should Wear Underpants by Matthew Inman (aka The Oatmeal), 4/5

Recklessly funny, Inman doesn’t hold back at all in this collection of comics which tackles topics from commuting via polar bear to eating Play-Doh.  This book is definitely not for the sensitive soul–while he considerately pixelates most of the cartoon privates, the author does somehow manage to invent euphemisms that are more offensive than the real thing.

[Why I read it: I’m on an Inman binge.]

My Dog: The Paradox

my dog the paradox inman andrews mcmeel 2013My Dog: The Paradox: A Lovable Discourse about Man’s Best Friend, by Matthew Inman (aka The Oatmeal), 3/5

This book contains only one comic, so it is more of a novelty than anything.  However, it is still pretty cute and I recognise his cartoon dog’s infectious enthusiasm in my own mutt (though mine certainly uses fewer swearwords).

[Why I read it: ordered all of Inman’s stuff from the library at once, then read it in one sitting.]

How to Tell if Your Cat is Plotting to Kill You

how to tell if your cat is plotting to kill you inman andrews mcmeel 2012How to Tell if Your Cat is Plotting to Kill You by Matthew Inman (aka The Oatmeal), 4/5

A laugh-out-loud-funny collection of cat-themed comics from The Oatmeal.

[Why I read it: Reading Inman’s The Terrible and Wonderful Reasons Why I Run Long Distances reminded me that he has other hilarious books out there that I hadn’t read yet.]

The Terrible and Wonderful Reasons Why I Run Long Distances

terrible and wonderful reasons why i run long distances inman oatmeal andrews mcmeel 2014The Terrible and Wonderful Reasons Why I Run Long Distances by Matthew Inman (aka The Oatmeal), 5/5

Inman’s reasons for running may be much more terrible and wonderful than my own (just as his conception of “long distances” is much longer), but a lot of this hilarious book resonated with me.  On a side note: I’ve never read a collection of comics containing more illustrations of Nutella.

[Why I read it: I enjoy Inman’s webcomic, The Oatmeal, and this book came up in conversation with one of Dad’s coworkers.  I’d actually almost bought it in a store just a few days previous before remembering that 5 Very Good Reasons to Punch a Dolphin in the Mouth was collecting dust on my shelf after being read just once.  I hit the library up instead, which I guess makes me a bad fan.]

What If?

what if randall munroeWhat If?: Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions by Randall Munroe, 5/5

What would happen if everyone on Earth stood as close to each other as they could and jumped, everyone landing on the ground at the same instant?  Is it possible to build a jetpack using downward-firing machine guns?  From what height would you need to drop a steak for it to be cooked when it hit the ground?

With his trademark wit, scientific know-how, and ability to draw strangely hilarious stick figures, Randall Munroe answers some of the vital questions that have been asked by readers of his webcomic, xkcd.  I expected this book to be underwhelming and a bit of a chore to read (à la almost all the other books based on webcomics I’ve encountered), but it was hilarious and accessible–my teenaged brother got his hands on it before me and read the whole thing in short order.  The content seems well-suited to book format and, surprisingly, I found it to be even funnier and more readable than the What If? blog that inspired its creation.

[Why I read it: I’ve been a fan of xkcd for several years now.]