Tagged: photography

Pose!

Pose! 1,000 Poses for Photographers and Models by Mehmet Eygi, 2/5

I like the basic layout of this book, which features one pose per page, each accompanied by a short summary, tips and three variations. Most of the poses seem to exist on a scale of somewhat to extremely cliched but presumably that is practically the point of a reference book like this. It is also understandable that many of the photos would feel lifeless and contrived, since they necessarily feature the same models and backdrops over and over again. Less forgivable are the extremely repetitive “tips” which add little additional value to the images, and the inclusion of many mediocre and a few absolutely cringe-worthy pose variations that made me question the author’s taste and expertise altogether.

My confidence in the author was further eroded by his brief “key lessons,” which did not display a nuanced or insightful perspective, but repetitively recommended a contrived and inorganic approach to photography at odds with common sense, psychology and my observation of other methods. What kind of photographer broadly advises others to methodically exhaust the possibilities of every single pose and variation before relentlessly moving on to the next? I was curious, so I visited Mehmet Eygi’s website (which was mentioned in two places in this book) and Facebook page. Surprisingly, neither features any of his photography or even mentions his name: they represent his comp card printing/design business. His Instagram page, where he identifies only as “Entrepreneur & Author,” is certainly no convincing testament to his photographic expertise either, displaying only a few generic pictures. In fact, I could find no other website, portfolio, resume or examples of his work not associated with this particular book, which seems very strange. Though Pose! does technically fulfill the promise of its title, I feel that it attempted to accomplish more and failed.

Why I read it: I’m trying to improve my photography and ordered every book on posing my library had.

David Busch’s Canon EOS 5d Mark IV

David Busch’s Canon EOS 5d Mark IV Guide to Digital SLR Photography, 5/5

Much more appealing than the chunky little manual that came with my camera, this book is thoughtfully laid-out and well-illustrated. I read straight through it, but it was also easy to look up the answers to specific questions, thanks to the functional index.

Why I read it: Because I was waiting for my new camera to arrive and knew this model would be a bit different from my previous one.

The Edge of the World

The Edge of the World: A Visual Adventure to the Most Extraordinary Places on Earth, by the editors of Outside Magazine, 5/5

What’s not to like about a collection of high-quality action photos accompanied by descriptions that provide interesting context from the photographers’ perspectives?

Why I read it: Part of an armload of photography books I checked out of the library.

Architecture in Photographs

architecture in photographs gordon baldwin getty publications 2013Architecture in Photographs by Gordon Baldwin, 4/5

I enjoyed this little book, which contains a nice selection of photographs from the J. Paul Getty Museum along with a not-overwhelming amount of text about architectural photography’s venerable history.  While a couple of the photographs left me shaking my head, completely unable to discern any artistic merit in them, the majority were inspiring and obviously captured with skill and care.  In my experience, looking at good art is the easiest way to educate your eye as a photographer and this book provides plenty of inspiration.  After reading it, I feel especially motivated to experiment with black and white photography, while not obsessing so much over cropping choices, lens distortion and making everything perfectly level.

Why I read it: I came across it while browsing in the library for light reading material to keep me entertained while cutting weight for an MMA fight two months ago.

Beach Stones

beach stones josie iselin margaret carruthers harry n abrams 2006Beach Stones, photography by Josie Iselin, text by Margaret W. Carruthers, 5/5

Great photography and informative descriptions make for a book that is as beautiful as it is interesting.

Why I read it: a random library find.

Grand Illusions

grand illusions lawton 1973 mcgraw-hillGrand Illusions by Richard Lawton, with a text by Hugo Leckey, 5/5

This collection of Hollywood portraits from the 1920s through 40s is full of mesmerisingly beautiful black and white images.  Famous actors and actresses, exquisite lighting, glamorous settings–this book is literally a feast for the eyes.

[Why I read it: it caught my eye in the thrift store.]