Tagged: 1938

Unsolved Mysteries of the Arctic

Unsolved Mysteries of the Arctic by Vilhjalmur Stefansson, 4/5

Written by a bona fide Arctic explorer, this book reflects a bygone era of exploration, when sane men packed up and left on insane adventures into unexplored territory from which they well knew they might never return. Indeed, every one of the five stories in this book involves death or disappearance, often punctuated by the horrors of starvation, betrayal, cannibalism and pure ineptitude. The author is not shy in drawing his own conclusions for each scenario and though his writing style is not the most entertaining, his first-hand experience and rational approach to the information available at the time make for a fascinating read.

I learned a lot from this book, such as that the Arctic, which I once imagined to be an abandoned ice desert, is (or at least, was) actually livable land, teeming with life. Unintuitively, the Inuit would move north during winter due to the abundance of game in the frozen landscape, killing everything from seals to polar bears without the aid of guns (often in territory in which well-armed Europeans managed to starve to death). I also learned a lot about scurvy, its causes and surprising psychological effects. According to Stefansson, scurvy plagued those explorers who tried to maintain a European diet, even when supplemented by fruits and vegetables. It was the author’s strong opinion that a diet consisting solely of native, fatty meat was the best way to stay healthy in the Arctic. It’s strange to think that the ketogenic diet is still controversial after over 80 years of arguments and studies.

Why I read it: an impulse buy in a used book store; for $3, who could resist?

Rebecca

rebecca du maurier doubledayRebecca by Daphne du Maurier, 4/5

This classic psychological thriller, with its unsettling, gothic atmosphere and ambiguously motivated characters, proves that “slow-burner” and “page-turner” are not mutually exclusive terms.  Du Maurier knows how to reveal just enough to keep her readers hooked without letting them quite know what is going on.  Ultimately, the characters seem a bit thin and the plot somewhat unsubstantial and uneven, but it’s the kind of book that will keep you up at night (reading, that is).

Why I read it: my mom watched the film versions, then got the book out of the library and enjoyed it.